What are some of the problems with manual therapy?

PodChatLive is the weekly live on Facebook for the continuing education of Podiatrists and other people that will be interested in the topics that this show talks about. Although the stream goes out live on Facebook the recorded version is afterward added to YouTube. Every live show includes a different expert or number of guests to go over a unique theme in each episode. Questions are addressed live by the hosts and guests during the live stream on Facebook. There's even a PodCast adaptation of each episode available on iTunes and also Spotify and the other traditional podcast platforms. They have accumulated a big following which keeps increasing. PodChatLive is viewed as one of the many approaches where podiatrists may get free professional improvement credits, hours or points.

Just about the most popular and debatable episode that they did was one with the physiotherapist, Adam Meakins where they talked about what manual treatments are and what impacts they have and more just what he is certain that it doesn’t accomplish, which is why he thinks it “sucks”. They also discussed issues including subluxed cuboids, pelvic stability, trigger points as well as palpation pareidolia. Some prior shows with other experts had been pro manual therapy and this ended up being undoubtedly an anti-manual treatment show. Considered together these episodes can offer those a very good overview of the pros and cons with the arguments for and against the use of manual treatments in clinical practice. Lots of this is dependant on the quality of the data and the way one chooses to spin that evidence to back up whatever you decide to or may not believe in. Adam Meakins is a physical therapist in the United Kingdom in which he works as an extended Scope Practitioner in both the NHS and the private sector located in and around Hertfordshire, England. Adam operates the Sports Physio website along with a range of courses for physical therapists. Adam is known for a visible social media presence, often arguing manual therapies matters.